Robotech RPG Tactics Unboxing

•October 31, 2014 • 1 Comment

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So I received my copy of Robotech RPG Tactics the other day. The unboxing in all of it’s glory will follow but for now just a short view of what came with my Wave 1 pledge. First off I must say that the box art is spectacular! The box itself is solid and feels as if it will withstand shelf wear well. Points for Palladium on that, I hate flimsy boxes (I’m looking at you Fantasy Flight!).

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The second item I pulled from le box was my bonus Wave 1 miniatures. This bag is still unopened, we’ll get to why later.

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Next we have the Battlefoam bag. This is one of the best parts of this Kickstarter. The Battlefoam bag is sturdy with tons of pockets and compartments and there is enough space inside to carry my entire fleet of ships it seems! The material is thick and strong and the foam inserts feel solid as opposed to some inserts I have dealt with.

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And bonus! Look what I found inside the bag. A print of the front cover of the box. I’m quite happy with the quality of this print, it feels solid. I’ll definitely be framing and mounting this guy like a redneck mounts a deer head (creepy). Hey not judging, I have rednecks in the family.

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The first look inside the box has gotten me a little jittery. The old hands don’t work so well so assembly is daunting for us precious, yes it is. Harg, SPRUES! Harg, Lots of them! Oh well, we’ll get to that down the line.

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Anyone who knows me knows I am a sucker for dice, hands down. I have tons of them and you can never have enough dice. Weird dice to useful dice. Doesn’t matter, have dice. These guys are good quality. Solid plastic with colored pips and a special ‘6’ side. But what’s to review beyond that? Dice.

Now onto assembly. Oh the humanity. The instructions, for me anyway, were woefully devoid of true explanation so some figuring out was required. No matter, I’m a reasonably intelligent mammal so here we go! The first part I assembled was the main body of a guardian-mode Valkyrie. I chose this because it was the first sprue I put my hands on. Putting everything together (once you guess where it actually fits) is the easy part. You put a dab of glue in the hole and put the piece together, easy enough to prevent too big of a mess. The only parts so far that I have had a problem with are the nose-cone and the leg-to-torso joints. For the case of the nose cone I recommend a dab (oh so small) of glue at or around the tip to keep it flush. Mine kept coming apart just a hair.

The leg joints fit in a small grove at the rear of the bottom half of the jet body. This tiny little hole-and-peg configuration was difficult for Mr. Monkey hands to hold together without getting glue all over himself. I had a similar problem assembling the arms, they are relatively small so putting a dab of glue in a single peg hole isn’t enough. You have to line it up well so I suggest putting it down on a flat surface after applying the glue (and wiping the excess off of the part going on the flat surface!). Once you assemble the lower arm you have to attach that to the upper part of the arm. Now the arms, as I’ve found are interchangeable. You can either have the arms holding the gun or (as I have below) have a one-handed gun configuration. Both look pretty neat.

The wings were easy to glue. There is a tab and slot that holds them in place for you pretty much. The model below is almost complete. I have to put the gun turrets on the bottom of it and they are teeny tiny! I mean crazy small! So we’ll see how that goes. All-in-all except for rather vague assembly instructions this is a solid product for those Robotech, RPG, and tactical combat monkeys out there. Definitely worth the buy.

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Call for Vandrel!

•August 25, 2014 • Leave a Comment

So I’ve come to the point of rolling an actual character for Dungeons and Dragons 5e. So as I type this I am writing stats and whatnot down on the character sheet. The tactual sensation of holding the pencil and paper and flipping through the book brings me back to my first character in D&D 1e. This is going to be a messy post, I’m sorry!

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So my first roll was an eighteen and I ended up keeping the first array of 18, 17, 15, 14, 13, 11. Choosing a race is the next so I went with Wood Elf. Being a Wood Elf grants the following abilities:

Elf
+2 Dexterity
30ft Speed
Darkvision
Proficiency in the Perception skill
Advantage on charm saving throws, immunity to sleep
Trance for 4 hours instead of sleeping
Common and Elvish

Wood Elf
+1 Wisdom
Proficiency with Longsword, Shortsword, shortbow and longbow
+5 to speed (Making it 35ft)
Mask of the Wild – You can attempt to hide even when you are only lightly obscured by foliage, heavy rain, falling snow, mist and other natural phenomena.

Basic Starting Information
Hit Points 11
Light Armor, Medium and Shields
Simple and Martial Weapons
Proficiency with Strength and Dexterity saving throws
Skills chosen: Animal Handling, Nature, Stealth
Proficiency bonus +2
Favored Enemy – Giants, advantage to track, recall information, gain racial language (I’m guessing giant here).
Natural Explorer – Forest this grants several benefits from improved travelling to foraging and tracking. I am not going to type them all.

After that the next section of the book focuses on character details. The name I chose, obviously, is Vandrel which is a throwback name from my longest-standing campaign. Sex and gender is touched on in a very progressive manner as never before seen in a D&D game. Not only do they emphasize that males and females are no different but they touch on alternative lifestyles as well. While I have never been one to mix sex and RPGs it is refreshing to see that Wizards of the Coast can print such things in confidence.

Since I am an elf, the next section about height and weight designates that my base height is 4’6″ +2d10 and my base weight is 100lbs x1d4lb. Now this section has a little bit of underlying confusion unless you read the whole thing. You roll your 2d10 and use that number to add to your height and then multiply that by your weight modifier. In this case I got 12 so my height is 5’6″ and my weight is (1d4=3) 136lbs. Easy enough. When you’re done with that you choose any other physical characteristics that you may wish from skin color to tattoos or scars. He will have a tattoo on his face, a half leaf on the left side that helps cover a nasty scar given to him by the giant that killed his family.

Now that we’re done with that, on to alignment. Alignments of the past have returned. You have a choice of Lawful, Neutral or Chaotic and Good, Neutral or Evil. For this character, being a Wood Elf Ranger (Eventually Beastmaster) I think Chaotic Good fits. Chaotic Good (CG) creatures act as their conscience directs, with little regard for what others expect. Copper dragons, many elves, and unicorns are Chaotic Good. His languages, as covered previously, will be Common and Elvish.

Personality Traits, Ideals, Bonds and Flaws are next. The easiest way to define the two personality traits of your character are to look at your lowest and highest stats (as recommended by the book) and use those two stats to define something about your character’s persona. Since Dexterity is his highest and Intelligence is his lowest we will start there. The high dexterity reflects his training versus larger opponents. He’s never been an overtly strong man but he has always had the advantage of his physical quickness. His intelligence says to me that this character has spent more time training to defeat his enemies than researching and burying his head in books. One thing to keep in mind here is that stats at 10 are average, anything more is above average. So my two traits will read like this: I have trained to face my foes with superior speed but I have struggled in recovering from the grievous head wound given to me by the giant that slew my parents. He is very self-sure about his speed but gets angry when he is faced with something he cannot surpass intellectually. Moving on to ideals, bonds and flaws I think I will use the table enclosed in the book under my background.

The background I picked for Vandrel is Outlander. They are survivalists and nomads. In the case of Vandrel I am going to paint him as a woodland guide of sorts. The kind of elf that enjoys the wilds more than people. He will take you wherever you need to go, for a fee of course. The boons granted to him are the Athletics and Survival skills, one musical instrument, one language of your choice and a smattering of equipment. You also get the wanderer feature which grants you a memory for terrain and maps and allows you to forage for up to 5 people per day.

1d6 on the Ideals chart: 1, Change. Life is like the seasons, in constant change, and we must change with it.
1d6 on the Bonds chart: 4, I am the last of my tribe, and it is up to me to ensure their names enter legend.
1d6 on the Flaws chart: 2, There’s no room for caution in a life lived to the fullest.

All-in all it seems like this character is coming out well. His starting wealth ends up being 170gp. From there I purchased him a suit of studded leather (AC 12+DEX) because his DEX mod is 5 and medium armor is a max of 2 DEX bonus. I have decided to make him an archer so I need to focus on his ranged weapon first. He rates a Longbow and a Pike. To top him off I am going to get him an explorer’s pack. (110gp which leaves him 60 for other endeavors). His trinket, which is an interesting little piece of your past. I got A dragon’s bony talon hanging from a plain leather necklace.

That’s it, it’s that simple! The rest is up to you. The basics are covered and from there your character can only grow. It’s that simple. Set your stats and choose your options.

Dungeons and Dragon’s 5th Edition: An Addict’s Tale

•August 22, 2014 • Leave a Comment

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Once again we find another edition of Dungeons and Dragons in the quivering sweaty palms of the Dungeon Master. I’ve been around for a while, I started with 1st Edition and since then I have adopted, and moved to, each edition of D&D regardless of the stigma that was attached to each. I’m looking at you 4e, yeah you. I have been a staunch supporter of TSR and after that Wizards of the Coast for years. 4th Edition was fun, it had its flaws but so does every system. 5th edition has absolutely won my heart over. It’s hard to describe the feeling of nostalgia when faced with the beautiful new art direction. From cover to cover the artwork feels fluid, more than it has ever felt and in a sense it feels more real. That sounds strange but I got a twinge of giddiness when I was turning the page (especially the equipment section) just to peruse the look and feel of the book. The chapter layouts make sense with the introductions in the front set out to give you a basic history of the game and the core concepts of role-playing games in general. Overall I give the aesthetics of the book my hat, not just tipping it but take the damn thing it’s yours!

Moving on to the individual sections the example of how to build a character is well placed and well written, even someone new to the game would have no problem following along. Stats have the same familiar feel as before (Strength, Constitution, Dexterity, Intelligence, Wisdom, Charisma) with the same +1 bonus for every two points above 10 and -1 for every two points below 10. Easy enough. Attacks, Skills and Saves have all been simplified without subtracting the meat of the system. Everything you do is tied to a statistic. Roll and add your ability modifier and if you’re proficient in that action you add your proficiency bonus (which scales to your level) to the roll. So your attacks are 1d2o+Mod+Bonus+Anything else. Melee attacks are 1d20+STR Mod+Proficiency, Ranged attacks are 1d20+DEX Mod+Proficiency and so on and so forth. Gone are the clunky mechanics of having proficiency modifiers by weapons or miscellaneous weird bonuses to add up. Skills work the same way. If you are proficient with a skill it uses the same formula, if you are not proficient with the skill you just roll an ability check. Much easier than any other edition with skills. I’m sold. Saving throws follow a similar vein, even with the proficiency modifiers and honestly you don’t get any more simple than that.

The races feel more simple and to the point. A large amount of the unneeded fluff has been removed but in a good way. All of the basic information you need is there along with a few tidbits covering some of the different worlds that D&D encompasses. The base races all have a primary set of abilities and a secondary set that goes with your sub-race. Elves are a good example. You get a basic array of stats then choose a sub-race (High, Wild, Drow, etc) that subrace gives you a few more abilities as well. Simple, no changing stats or level adjustments needed.

Classes are much-improved but there is way too much for me to get in to in such a simple review (that’s what I aim for!). Every class has its place and they all feel powerful enough without being overpowered compared to other classes. Every class has several roles and options you can adopt. No more oddball prestige classes or themes to follow. You choose your class, pick your options and elect your archetype at 3rd level. The flavor is there, it’s just easier to taste without overpowering your senses. Everything flows properly. I went from page to page without stopping to scratch my head once. When you’ve chosen your class you then choose your background and while 4e did make your background somewhat significant, 5e makes it useful. You get skills, equipment and abilities to use depending on what you choose.

Your character’s alignment, beliefs, goals and other driving aspects are important in this edition too. The emphasis on role-playing is there watching you roll your character and nodding approvingly; and here’s why. In this edition you get an addition d20 roll for either having advantages or disadvantages. You roll two d20s for either and take the highest for advantage or lowest for a disadvantage. Why is that important? Inspiration! Your dungeon master (or another player that has been awarded inspiration) can give you a spare d20 to hold on to that can be used as an advantage later on. This award comes from using your character’s background and driving forces to guide your role-playing. That’s a damn nice incentive to get someone to play their character instead of metagame.

And the feats, oh the feats! You feats are no longer just little tidbits you may use from time to time. Feats are now more like defining attributes. Feats have been expanded to the point of adding significant advantages to your character’s attributes and rolls. Every feat has a benefit for almost every class. There are no useless feats here. I have not experienced that before, I was pleasantly astounded the first time I read through the feats.

Combat rules have been simplified down to the basics. You have a move action and an attack action on your turn. You can even break up actions and use them partially! If you have a 30ft movement speed you can move 15ft, attack, then move 15 more feet. If you have two movement modes you can move, attack, and keep moving using both movement modes. If you have multiple attacks or bonus actions you can choose how and when to use them. Combat has never felt so mobile and realistic but simple at the same time. Your conditions have changed a little but nothing is overtly clunky or complicated. This is the first edition that I can safely say I understand the grappling rules. That’s huge! Bonuses are usually granted in the form of advantage or disadvantage with some exceptions for things like cover. Again, fluid. Resting takes on the form of short rests (for spending hit dice and healing) and extended rests which work just like you would imagine.

Spellcasting has been much-improved. Every class has its own role and spells are usable more often but not in a way that breaks the game. Cantrips are actually worth using now. Your spell attacks, again, are as simple as your basic attacks. Now admittedly I did not read every spell, that would have taken forever, but I did browse through and pick a few favorites. I found no disappointing or useless spells in my first perusal.

Bottom line: Buy it, even if you are a subscriber to the edition wars give it a chance. It feels like old school gaming wrapped up in a pretty new package. The question I’ve been asked is ‘Why would I do that if I can just use my old school books?’. My answer is the same. This edition is worth it. The art is amazing, the rules are much simpler (by the gods THAC0 was TERRIBLE) and it is well written with good, solid community feedback invested in it. Lose your THAC0 good sir (or madam) and adopt this edition!

Better yet, you can get the basic rules for FREE. There’s no amount of bitching that can top that:
D&D 5e Basic Rules

The Strange RPG – A simple review for a simple system.

•August 20, 2014 • Leave a Comment

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I recently got my copy of The Strange from Kickstarter. Let me preface this by saying that I own Numenera, I backed the Kickstarter for that as well and I was skeptical of the Cypher system at first. I have since changed my mind about how the system functions. At first glance the book is beautiful, they spared no expense on the artwork and the layout is fantastic. Very eye-pleasing, that is a big plus for me.

The system itself is simple but elegant, using mostly a D20 and the occasional D6 or D100. Your attacks, defense, checks, and 99% of all other player interactions will be comprised of a D20 roll plus or minus modifiers depending on the situation. The Strange puts the theory of multiple dimensions in to play in a very interesting manner. The Strange itself is a ‘network’ so-to-speak put in place by an ancient civilization. This network connects different recursions in varied ways. Translating to a different recursion has a few basic requirements. First off you have to contain ‘the spark’ which most characters are assumed to have. They must also be quickened, which all characters are assumed to be or will be soon. Basically you have to have the potential and know (on some level) that the strange exists. Going from place to place requires either certain items (for the first try) or a gate. From there you can go back as often as you want. We’ll go into that a little more later.

There are three stats to the system: Might, Speed, and Intellect. Each of these stats have a pool, which is the actual measurement of the stat itself. The pool has many uses you can spend points in your pool to use abilities or moves or heroic actions. The pool also serves as your de facto hit points starting with Might. We’ll get in to that later. Second off, each pool has an edge. Your edge reduces the cost of using that particular pool as each stat has its own edge. The last major part of your stats is your effort. Effort is a measurement of how heroic you can get, how much of your pool can you spend to take an action. Obviously more advanced characters can make more daring and impossible moves. Effort can also be used to increase the damage you do.

In the system itself there are three classes, one tied to each stat pool, Vectors to Might, Spinners to Speed and Paradoxes to Intellect. That being said, each class has use for each stat. Within each class there are not levels but tiers. Vectors are your go to ‘tanks’ per-se. Vectors rely heavily on their Might pool to beat peoples’ faces in. Most of their options deal mostly in doing extra damage or utilizing physical skills with side emphasis on defense and assisting others. Paradoxes are akin to spell casters than anything else and rely mostly on the intellect pool. Their abilities range wildly but take a hard line on defense, utility and some damage. They also have some control aspects to help manage the battlefield. Spinners rely on intellect and speed for the most part. They are, in a literal sense of the world, spinners using their inherent ‘charisma’ to baffle, confuse and generally control things. They are versatile in their abilities and have a lot of options that span from utilities and on.

Each tier requires the player to spend about 16 XP to advance four different aspects of their class. After that advancement they gain a set number of features and/or abilities. Every tier they gain at least 1 move (for Vectors), twist (for Spinners) or revision (for Paradoxes) and can replace one of their existing abilities with one of their current tier or lower. This makes it easy to swap an ability you don’t use very often for another.

The core of the Cypher system is your defining sentence. I am an adjective noun who verbs. By now you should know your noun, Vector, Spinner or Paradox.This brings us to the character’s descriptor and focus. Your descriptor is your flavor. You get a small bonus to a stat, a skill and a minor ability or enhancement. The core descriptors are Appealing, Brash, Clever Fast, Graceful, Intelligent, Lucky, Sharp-eyed, Skeptical, Stealthy, Strange, Strong and Tough. Every character has Foci, and depending on what rules your current recursion follows it may change depending on where you are. Since each recursion has its own rule set you may go from standard physics to a recursion that supports magic or enhanced science. Your character’s Focus adds more than just flavor to your class, it gives you greater definition and scales with your class tier giving you benefits as you advance. Some Foci can be utilized in other recursions and some cannot. When you translate to different recursions your gear changes with you to the best it can. Otherwise any unique items (with exceptions) are stored in a sort of limbo until you return to the plane tied to that body.

the base rules are laid out in a very straightforward manner. No matter what you’re doing your task is set to a difficulty number. That number equates to 3 points of difficulty for every 1 rating. Easy enough. If you’re taking a level 6 creature you have to hit a target number of 18 with your roll plus bonuses and effort. Of course there is a little more to it than that but that is the gist of the system, the basics. Certain conditions can make things more favorable or less favorable. Having higher ground for instance modifies your roll by one step, either in your favor or against.

Recursions at a glance:
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Translating from place to place is covered in very easy terms as well. It is handled with a D20 roll and some time is added for meditating on the destination and recovery when you translate. Different classes get different abilities to ease this transition which makes it prudent to have at least one of each class with you when you translate. Once you have been to a place you no longer need the initial items to focus on (see the Core book page 125 for more details on translating).

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My favorite part of this are the recursions themselves (and the fact that your PCs can create their own). The primary three are Earth (as we know it), Ardeyn (magic-based) and Ruk (advanced science) though there are many different dimensions to visit. Earth is a focal point in the madness of The Strange, it is unique (and I’m not telling why!) and because of the special circumstances that link Earth to The Strange it has generated hundreds of recursions. Ardeyn is a construct borne of the efforts of someone from earth. It was Carter Strange, the earth resident that first discovered The Strange, that create Ardeyn to save earth (No spoilers here again! I’m not saying!). Ruk operates on Mad Science, specifically biotechnology and body modification. Ruk is a recursion from another part of the strange that seems to be stuck on the shoals of earth after fleeing some sort of disaster. Other recursions exist as well. Atom Nocturne which operates under the laws of Psionics and is heavily influenced by Anime from earth. The Graveyard of the Machine God is a recursion that is based solely around the body of a dead mechanical god, this body is inhabited by creatures that used to be its servants. Gloaming introduces a parallel earth where vampires and werewolves exist. There are recursions for Oz, Sherlock Holmes and (my favorite) Wonderland to name a few.

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The rest of the book covers monsters, Cyphers, expanding the rules, building a story and DM advice and finally a short adventure (which I will also not spoil).

All in all I can say this for a fact: If you have not picked up The Strange, get it now. Go, I’ll wait. Seriously though, this book is worth the money. There is a lot of information for players and GM’s alike. They have also condensed the information for players into a smaller player’s guide which takes out some of the fluff and GM information and just gives the players what they need to build a character. I can’t wait to see what’s next! Monte, Bruce, from one GM, Writer and gamer to another; Hats off to you good sirs, you have designed the game I’ve been looking for.

The Strange on Facebook
Monte Cook Games

Call of Cthulhu (D20 Edition)

•July 9, 2014 • Leave a Comment

So I have recently started playing in a D20 Cthulhu campaign. It’s set in the 1920s in a small town in Maine called Derby. Now Derby has seen its fair share of weird apparently, the only character left from the original campaign the DM was running has seen some wild shit apparently. Hyde, a quiet, solemn character with quick wit and a hand for invention. My character, one Trenton (Trent) Connery is loosely based on the appearance of Trent Reznor in ‘The perfect drug’. A gray silk suit with a top hat and cane tops off the outlandish personality of a psychic psychologist formerly of the famed Arkham Asylum. Virginia, a jack of all trades daughter of a brain-addled former soldier is the third of our group. Last, but not least we have Ivy, she is an african-american jazz musician straight from New Orleans.

The system is elegant but brutal. Character creation is laid out in a familiar manner for those who have experienced D&D 3.0 and 3.5. You’ll fall right into making a dynamic victim, pardon, person straight from the mythos. The job system just gives you starting cash and a set of skills to use so no added fluff there.

Your stats are Strength (Physical Prowess), Dexterity (Physical Speed), Constitution (Hardiness), Intelligence (Book learnin’ y’all), Wisdom (Less of the cleric variety more of the doctor variety) and Charisma (Which is not a dump stat for me this time!). After rolling (usually 4d6 drop lowest), you assign your stats and begin building your character. Skills can be customized to any degree, I tweaked mine a bit to reflect a psychic and occultist lurking underneath Mr. Connery’s grounded exterior. After choosing feats and gear you’re done. It’s relatively simple. For Trenton I chose Sensitive and Second Sight for feats. Unfortunately this opens me up to more sanity loss in the form of psychic sensitivity and peeling back the veil of safety offered to most humans. Yay!

It’s a good system and a great way to start into horror gaming. Go grab a copy if you can.

Journal of Trenton Gray Connery June 1927
I’ve read, written and studied all I can stand from the strangeness of occult lore. So much I fear for my own sanity. My grandfather was a good man, an honest man, but something happened in the jungles of Brazil that took away most of the fleeting wisps of mental fortitude he had left. When I look back at the times I sat with him as a youth and listened to his fanciful tales of strange beasts in the jungles and seas of the world I sometimes wonder if he was telling me the truth of our existence. He believed (I know because he told me himself) that our world, our reality is nothing but a piece of frail silk drawn over the veil of the universe. One would have to be mad to not believe in the world in a more heliocentric manner but for thousands of years we were ignorant of that fact. That thought bears the fruit of recurrence. What else might we not know? The talk of gods and monsters sends cold fingers down the whole of my spine, but I cannot stop asking.

A woman by the name of Beth Perkins has reached out to me about her son Jacob. Normally I would recommend a colleague for such work but in her letters she mentioned that her son was lost in the woods for two days then emerged near-catatonic with a shock of white hair. What on god’s green earth could cause a child to react as such. There is something supernatural about this case, I know it, that is why I must take it myself. It would be no large endeavor to travel under the guise of gathering information for my next book. What awaits me in the not-so-sleepy little town of Derby, Maine?

The Nebulous Theory of Hit Points

•June 19, 2014 • Leave a Comment

Sorry for the long absence, I’ve been busy beyond all belief. With that in mind I have put much thought into the concept of HP or hit points. Let’s state the obvious, hit points are there to measure when you die. Now that we’ve gotten that business out of the way let’s talk about what hit points really are. You must know by now that it is impossible for someone to take a stab in the chest twenty times before they drop to the ground screaming. Hit points are a measure of the amount of abuse you take but not as you think.

You dodge and roll and tuck and move and sway and swing your sword and take a few glancing blows. All of this represents your hit points. When someone scores a hit they’ve more than likely given you a nick or a bruise but in most circumstances they’ve not actually penetrated, if you’ll pardon the use of the word. Think of it this way, you attempt to dodge their blow and take a glancing hit and both your actions and their bruising takes a toll on your stamina. That is what hit points really are. Otherwise what’s the use of a critical hit? Think about it: a critical hit, depending on the situation and your DM, can be anything from max damage to double max damage to losing a limb. That is a hit, that is real loss of hit points. The rest of it is just the toll of combat.

It puts a perspective on bleeding out. That last blow, that one hit that actually fells your character is the blow that opens a serious wound. It makes healing magic more believable too. Sure, it can close wounds and all that but think about the books and movies and stories that all involve healing magic and realize that sometimes the magic is not enough because a wound is too grave. It makes sense doesn’t it? You can’t resurrect or heal everyone because all wounds are different in their severity. Healing magic refreshes the body and clears up bruises and hurts and scrapes and minor cuts. Real healing magic closes wounds and brings you back from the dead. That magic is more rare and harder to obtain is it not?

So before you decide that the goblin’s spear penetrates your character’s armor, think more that the goblin’s spear left a bruise under his armor. That’s what hit points are. So go out there and hug your party cleric!

Demiourgos

•January 8, 2014 • Leave a Comment

So the old crusty DM has finally gotten around to publishing a book. Fantasy of course, what else? Many thanks to those who read it.

Description (Much thanks to my Co-DM blogger for the edits on this!)
Alethia Rose leads the mundane life of a sheltered slave in a dying world, a life that is irrevocably altered when a young elf helps her unlock a power hidden deep in her bloodline. Embracing newly found freedom, Rose embarks upon a journey that could either mend the shattered world or send it further down a spiral of destruction. Rose’s fateful passage takes her beyond the sands of her desert home, through the underground world, and into the alien astral fade.  Along the way Rose is exposed to love and loss, while clashing with adversaries that have laid even the gods low.  Her journey leaves her questioning whether the titanic opponents who threaten her friends, sanity, and the entire known world can even be defeated.

Buy Demiourgos on Amazon!

 
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